Wudpecker Journal of Agricultural Research                                                            ISSN 2315-7259

Vol.  075 - 092 December 2015                                                                    2015 Wudpecker Journals

 

Management practices and morphological characterization of the indigenous (native) chicken in Samar province

 

Feleciano R. Bejar1, Lagrito Ebert B. Mante2, Reynaldo R. Aquino2, Manuel J. Baylon2, Jaime B. Fabillar2, Arturo A. Ultra2, Elvie T. Bejar2

 

1Principal researcher, faculty member, Northwest Samar State University, San Jorge Campus, San Jorge, Samar.

2Co-researchers and faculty members, Northwest Samar State University, San Jorge Campus, San Jorge, Samar.

 

*Corresponding author E-mail: bejar_43@yahoo.com.

 

Accepted 25 June 2015

 

The study focused on the management practices of raisers and the morphological characterization of indigenous (native) chickens in Samar province. A total of 330 respondents from the two districts of Samar were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Chickens were kept on free range without shelter and fed with naturally occurring feed materials like rice and corn bran, kitchen refuse and other farm by-products. Very minimal input in terms of feed supplementation, health care, breeding and selection, housing, and other forms of intervention to improve production was observed. Chickens were raised for home consumption and sold to earn ready cash for the family, particularly during school enrolment. Eighty to ninety percent of the eggs produced were retained for incubation; the rest were sold to buyers and used for family consumption. For live chickens, 30 percent were sent to the market, 30 percent were consumed, 30 percent were left in the farm for breeding, and the remaining 10% were shared to other purposes such as for cock fighting, religious, and friends who sometimes asked for a certain heads of chicken. In terms of morphological characteristics, most of the native chickens studied showed complete feather distribution with red plumage (46.96%). Other dominant attributes included white skin (89.98%), yellow shank without polydactyls (44.22%), red earlobe (83.71%), single comb (89.90%), and red double wattles (100%). The five problems usually encountered by the native chicken raisers included the advent of diseases due to the unpredictable climatic conditions in the province, stealing by other members of the community, limited feed supply, predation, and poor transportation in the countryside. To counter some of these issues, farmer respondents identified solutions such as financial support and access to production and management information through training and seminars.

 

Key words: Management practices, Indigenous, native chicken, morphological characterization.

 

 

  Cite this Reference:
 
Feleciano R. Bejar, Lagrito Ebert B. Mante, Reynaldo R. Aquino, Manuel J. Baylon, Jaime B. Fabillar, Arturo A. Ultra, Elvie T. Bejar (2015). Management practices and morphological characterization of the indigenous (native) chicken in Samar province. Wudpecker J. Agric. Res., 4(5): 075-092.